';
Hong Kong – Film Shoot – Day 6
Day 6 - Main points of interest. © 2018 Google
Day 6 - Main points of interest. © 2018 Google
Day 6 - Main points of interest. © 2018 Google
Day 6 - Main points of interest. © 2018 Google

A new day and week have arrived. I had a scheduled appointment to film at the ‘Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin’ temple complex. It is one of the more famous and popular landmarks in Hong Kong, providing a place for Buddhism, Daoism and Confucianism followers to practice their faith.

Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple
Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple

Due to time constraints, I had to renege on my promise to avoid using red urban taxis. There was one parked just outside the hotel and I needed to get to the temple asap. Luckily, this taxi experience was a normal one and I managed to get to my destination on time.

My early morning weekday arrival was greeted with a peaceful atmosphere and relatively few people. The temple structures, statues and grounds are beautiful. The earthy scent of petrichor, mixed with burning incense sticks and the daily worshipers of all walks of life, contributed to the spiritual ambiance.

Over the next hour or two I captured the scenes associated with a visit to the popular temple. Gradually, the number of visitors increased, yet not to a point of inconvenience.

Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple
Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple
Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple
Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple

I left the temple grounds and entered the nearby MTR station. The train whisked me and the morning rush hour commuters towards Central.

I emerged out of Central station at Statue Square. People’s party wear from the previous night was replaced by sharp business wear as Hong Kong’s finance professionals began their manic Monday ritual. Us tourists were dressed more or less the same, with emphasis on comfort more than style.

I took the time to document the local scene. The Cenotaph war memorial and its backdrop of the HSBC Headquarters building, Cheung Kong Centre and the Bank of China Tower, were impressive. High-end Chater road was full of delivery trucks and bike couriers. Pedder street was awash with well heeled pedestrians. Both streets intersect at Des Voeux road. Together they form one of the busiest intersections in Hong Kong.

Statue Square
Statue Square
Chater Road
Chater Road
The Cenotaph
The Cenotaph
Pedder Street, Des Voeux Road and Chater Road intersection.
Pedder Street, Des Voeux Road and Chater Road intersection.

I returned to the MTR and got off at Sheung Wan station. I made my way up Cleverly and Ladder streets until I reached Upper Lascar Row, also know as Cat street. This is the place to visit if you are interested in buying local antiques, home décor, paintings and souvenirs. It was not busy when I got there. The shop merchants outnumbered the tourists/customers.

As one who likes Chinese décor and art, I could have spent a long time exploring every shop and going home with several suitcases of merchandise. I settled on one item as a souvenir of my trip, as I normally do for every place I travel to.

Upper Lascar Row
Upper Lascar Row

As one who likes Chinese décor and art, I could have spent a long time exploring every shop and going home with several suitcases of merchandise. I settled on one item as a souvenir of my trip, as I normally do for every place I travel to.

Upper Lascar Row
Upper Lascar Row

The area south of Hollywood road, known as SoHo, is full of art galleries and cool wall murals. Since it was a weekday, it was fairly quiet. I took the time to stroll around, soaking in the local vibes and pressed on to my next scheduled filming destination.

One of the most popular landmarks in Hong Kong Is Man Mo Temple in Sheung Wan.

Interior hall of Man Mo Temple
Interior hall of Man Mo Temple

Although not crowded, there was a steady influx of locals and tourists into the small temple compound. I was greeted inside the dimly lit temple with a cloud of pleasant smelling incense smoke and the loud noise of fans trying to circulate the air. The occasional ringing of the gong was heard as well.

In this declared landmark, below the large incense coils, tourists and myself were documenting our visit while local Hong Kongers were praying and leaving offerings to the gods for the hope of success in life. Although I did not find the temple to be externally pleasing to the eye, the interior has a definite spiritual feel to it with the kind of décor you would expect to find.

Interior hall of Man Mo Temple
Interior hall of Man Mo Temple

I left the temple and documented my travels in Sheung Wan on my way to the Hong Kong – Macau Ferry Terminal. A few external shots of the terminal and the surrounding area and I was off again on foot towards Central.

Macau Ferry Terminal
Macau Ferry Terminal

For most of the year, Hong Kong is a HOT and HUMID place. Hong Kongers cope with it by spending as much time as possible in air-conditioned interiors. To reduce the time spent walking outside, numerous elevated walkways connect the buildings, minimizing the travel time between them.

Elevated walkway running alongside Connaught Road Central
Elevated walkway running alongside Connaught Road Central

Some of these walkways stretch hundreds of meters, acting as pedestrian arteries with offshoots to specific Central towers. I have spent a fair share of time using these walkways to get to various areas in Hong Kong Island.

Elevated walkway running alongside Connaught Road Central. It connects directly to the IFC Mall
Elevated walkway running alongside Connaught Road Central. It connects directly to the IFC Mall

I have previously mentioned that I have visited few places that rival Hong Kong in its opulence and display of wealth. One such place to witness this is at the IFC Mall in Central. Almost every imaginable luxury brand has its own store in this shopping mall mecca. This is just one of several extremely luxurious malls in Hong Kong.

Beyond window shopping at the mall, my main goal was to eat. I chose to dine at the famous restaurant chain ‘Tasty Congee & Noodle Wantun Shop’. The ‘shop’ was more akin to a fancy restaurant. The food I have ordered was good but not great. Perhaps my expectations were too high. I enjoyed my experience nevertheless.

It was approaching sunset. For the daily sunset shooting location, I chose to capture Hong Kong from the IFC Mall balcony, over-viewing Victoria Harbour. It was a good choice.

View from the IFC Mall balcony
View from the IFC Mall balcony

I took the escalator downstairs to Hong Kong Station and used the underground walkway to get to the Central MTR station. I boarded the packed train and disembarked at Wan Chai Station. I went against the flow of the office workers making there way home and returned to the Central Plaza building’s sky lobby to capture night fall.

I was surprised to find no other photographers at this hour. Disregarding the frequent sound of the elevator announcing its arrival at the floor and the clacking of heels on the marble floor, I witnessed Hong Kong’s transformation into a futuristic looking metropolis, like those read upon in science fiction cyberpunk novels.

Night-time view of Central in Hong Kong Island
Night-time view of Central in Hong Kong Island

Normally, building security close the sky lobby at 8 pm, just before the beginning of the ‘Symphony of Lights’ show in Victoria Harbour. But on this evening, I managed to stick around for another 30 minutes and was able to capture the light show. It was a beautiful sight. Mind you that if you leave the building after 8 pm, security requires you to sign out before leaving.

I returned to the MTR and took the train to Causeway Bay Station. The area around the main department stores is just as lively at night as it is during the day. It looks far nicer at night. The electrical bill must be huge!

Causeway Bay. Hong Kong Island
Causeway Bay. Hong Kong Island

An hour or two into filming Causeway Bay and I was tired and aching. It was time to go back to the hotel and call it a day. Tomorrow was going to be just as busy.

Comments
Share
globetrotteralpha

Leave a reply